Stick to the script, Honduras!

Plot Summary An innocent protector of the poor is exiled by a military coup, only to rally his people and make a triumphant return against the oppressors. It’s a great three-act script worthy of a Hollywood movie. “Based on a true story.” Hand over the Oscar, thank you. In our 21st century marriage of entertainment and journalism, this is the story the mainstream media (MSM) would like you to believe transpired in Honduras during the summer of 2009. Americans were fed the tale of Honduran President Mel Zelaya, champion of the impoverished, ousted at gunpoint in his pajamas in a classic coup engineered by power-hungry elitists. Clips of Zelaya demanding his rightful reinstatement were interspersed with stock footage of civil » read more «

24 Hour Curfew for Honduras

A 24-hour curfew is currently being enforced for all of Honduras thanks to the surreptitious return of ousted President Mel Zelaya to Tegucigalpa, which has prompted small riots and protests across the country. News of Zelaya’s return hit West End, Roatan, around noon yesterday (21 Sept 2009). Phone and internet connections became jammed by the heavy bandwidth load of people logging on to find out the news. The facts were scattered, but one thing loomed certain: Zelaya was indeed back in Honduras. At 4:00PM, Roatan Municipal Police drove down West were ordering all businesses to close and everyone home. An curfew was in immediate effect until 6AM today. Both Hondutel and TIGO internet connections dropped out by 5:30PM. Digicel phone » read more «

Sobriety Strikes Roatan

For the first time in two years, Roatan has sobered up. As opposed to the time-honored tradition in America of getting absolutely blitzkrieged on booze whilst enduring the endless onslaught of CNN poll results on Election Day, Honduras prohibits all alcohol sales over election weekends. Given the volatile mix of machetes and machismo that permeates Honduran culture, the separation of Booze and State is probably a good idea. Between the irate Mainlanders barricading the rain-soaked streets and the Gringos drowning their frustrations while “trapped” in the bars, the continued sale of alcohol during the RECO protests earlier this month fueled island tensions to a stupid level. The game of politics is already mankind at our lowest; better to leave alcohol » read more «

Rain, Riots, Racism, and RECO

Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you got til it’s gone? November 4, 2008. After one month of depressingly endless rain and wind sinking Roatan to the mud-coated economic low that typifies the island rainy season, things are finally starting to look up. An eclectic international group of expatriates is intensely huddled around a television watching the results of the United States election trickle in. The excitement is palpable: inside, American international policy is finally about to make a profound transition that will hopefully mend the shattered relations between the United States and the rest of the world, while outside the wind is relenting and weather is finally making a turn for the better. When » read more «